Life Online: Avalanche Death

Interviewer: video.loss

“By expressing my aesthetic vision through music and artwork that I produce, rather than just staying as a lifeless consumer of the schizophrenic culture, I hold and claim my firm existence in the desolate world I’m living in.”

Avalanche Death is a producer from Seoul, South Korea. His production is varied, intricate and melodic. Avalanche Death is the first artist to be featured for our Life Online series, where we explore a curated selection of artist’s backgrounds and interests, and each artist has the option to provide a mix or playlist of music that holds significance to them. 

AVALANCHE_DEATH has joined #CO

<CO>

Where did you grow up and where are you based now?

<AD>

I was born and raised in Seoul. I had to live in different cities growing up but now I am with my family in Seoul.

<CO>

How did you get into making music?

<AD>

I’ve always had an interest in music growing up just like everybody else, but the moment where I started to build an intimate connection to music was my 6th grade English class. One day my ESL teacher brought a Youtube video as class material, where a guy writes down the lyrics of Daft Punk’s Harder Better Faster Stronger on his fingers and splays them as the song played in the background. I was fascinated by the song. From that day I started to research their works and that naturally led me into DJing. I bought a janky DJ controller from Hercules and had a good time with it. All I did for the next 3 years was come home from school dull, do some silly mashups and get bored again. I remember doing a mashup of Swedish House Mafia and Mr. Oizo with a ridiculous flanger on top. My parents liked it more than I did.

I then had to enter high school which was a boarding school. Bringing the whole setup was obviously a bad idea so I decided to move on to music production. Producing does not take much space and all you need is a laptop. I got a crack of FL Studio 10 from torrent and that is how I started to make music.

<CO>

Can you name some artists whose work has had a big influence on you?

<AD>

I went through some stylistic changes since the start, so it’s difficult to put all of my music under a single term of influence. But I could still say that trance/afterhours culture and Y2K futurism have worked as the two biggest impacts on my style until recently. Artist-wise, I would take people such as Easyfun, Ana Caprix, and Hannah Diamond as big influences to my style. Ever since I got hooked into PC Music from a JACK댄스 podcast back in 2015, what I considered as a musical ideal has always revolved around it.

Now I am trying to show more variety and widen my plane into more organic and pastoral sounds, to expand the scenery I built in my past project ‘lost n found’ and ‘BARDO’. Múm and Sun Angels or maybe some releases from the Swedish record label Sincerely Yours have given me a spiritual guideline when I lacked inspiration. My current goal is to manifest this influence by adopting the grammar of artists like Baths and Nosaj Thing.

<CO>

How has the internet influenced your style?

<AD>

As I mentioned in the previous question I didn’t really grow up surrounded by a lot of people. Naturally I spent most of my days wasting time on the internet. I remember being fascinated with Madeon’s famous ‘Pop Culture’ video on Youtube. I wanted to get myself an Ableton Launchpad to do the same thing shown in that video, so I started to collect information on Korean internet communities. I ended up reading a lot of warnings from kids my age on the internet that discouraged me to buy the gear because of the extra expenses of buying Ableton Live Suite. So I bought a normal DJ controller with 2 decks and a mixer. Although it wasn’t capable of crazy mashups, I had a great time with it.

In terms of the style, I feel like the fact that I loved watching a lot of live videos on Youtube of French artists when I started off still has a huge influence on me making music. I try to incorporate a lot of samples I get from the internet. I learned the beauty of sampling through Youtube and I try to show it in what I produce. I also believe that sampling reflects the kitsch nature of the internet, where data exists anonymously and gets reproduced anonymously.

<CO>

Who are some artists you are listening to at the moment?

<AD>

I am listening to Stereolab’s album Dots and Loops writing this answer. I’ve been listening to a lot of music similar to this style, as I wanted to find some references to my new project I am currently working on. Something i’ve been obsessed with lately is the Japanese artist ACO, and I feel miserable about myself that I can’t make something as beautiful as hers. The third track ‘lang’ of her album ‘irony’ is one of the most alluring tracks I have ever listened to.

<CO>

What inspires the themes in your music?

<AD>

I honestly don’t think much into the imagery or themes I want to create in the actual process of making music. Once I open FL Studio and gain inertia, it’s an endless sequence of almost inconsiderate improvisation of a sound that I hear in my head. I am just not capable of disposing certain elements in the song delicately to give the listener a particular, well-compromised impression. So I take enough time listening to other music or browsing the internet for inspiration that I could draw in and align myself with before making music

<CO>

How does creating art help you?

<AD>

Growing up I never felt attachment or a true sense of belonging. It doesn’t mean that I was a full-out loner in school, I had and have a lot of great friends in fact. The thing was that I was never able to find people whose interests I could truly relate to. Ironically that worked as the main factor leading to my obsession with music. By expressing my aesthetic vision through music and artwork that I produce, rather than just staying as a lifeless consumer of the schizophrenic culture, I hold and claim my firm existence in the desolate world I’m living in. Although I still feel like an outcast, I am happier than before because I create art. I will never stop doing so until the end of my life, for which I will be proudly accompanied (not in a suicidal manner) with the sound I created in the past being played in the headphones.

<CO>

How has connecting to people online influenced you?

<AD>

In such a great way. I would have probably quit music long time ago if it weren’t for the people I met online who show love towards my production. It’s crazy thinking about it, that a random dude half a world away actually bumps what I make. I feel achieved and happy, and it would have been the opposite if I was born in time before the internet.

<CO>

What is the significance of music you included in your mix for us?

<AD>

I tried to premiere some of my unreleased tracks and demonstrate what I enjoy the most lately. The first one is what me and my talented friend Dualsim did as a cover of ‘Swoon’ by The Chemical Brothers, which is my all-time favorite. They are no doubt one of my favorite artists as well, and that song has been stuck in mind for almost forever. It exhorts my nostalgia of the time I first heard the song, probably 8 years ago from now. I really felt the need to cover it because of it’s personal significance. I first thought of leaving it as an instrumental track, but it just didn’t sound right without any vocals. Then Dual’s voice crossed my mind, so I hit him up and that’s how the track is done.

Then the mix flows into another unreleased beat/track of mine with the help of Yabujin’s track in the transition. Yabujin’s music really reminds me of one of the dreams I have been having since I was very young, an industrial area full of rusty abandoned shipping containers covered with ivy. It’s based on the real place and setting I have been to once and been missing afterwards. After that I have put the songs that I profoundly enjoy at the moment, things from artists such as Academy Garden and Star Slinger. The mix comes to an end with the mashup with a track by SUS1ER “CHROME CAPITAL” and ‘Visions’ by Charli XCX. All works up to the finale which I made as a remix to Fedde Le Grande, Nicky Romero, Vicetone, and Matthew Koma’s ‘Sparks’.

The mix on the whole is not as energetic as my past mixes, but I hope it gets to the listeners properly with the original intent. Thanks for taking your time through the whole interview and have a wonderful day people!

AVALANCHE_DEATH has left #CO

Related Articles